About your Search

20130318
20130326
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37
florida governor jeb bush argues that the nation's immigration policy should be overhauled to reflect our current economic needs, but also should be b clear enough to enforce properly. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> now, our love whered president finish beloved president ronald reagan passed away almost ten years ago. but as many in this audience know, it seems nearly impossible to follow political news without hearing some reference to our 40th president. his memory, his name and, fortunately, his legacy seem to be ubiquitous as our country grapples with the challenges of our time. for many years, probably starting with the day after president reagan left office in 1989, there's been a famous question often asked when this is a particularly vexing problem facing our country. you've likely heard it before. we, the questioners often ask, well, what would reagan do? it's a good question to ask, because while times and technology and many faces have changed since president reagan was in office, some important fundamentals, those that speak to who we are as americans, have not.
were asked about their opinions of u.s. presidency george to view bush fell to the low of coal% but obama was elected and approval was 92% was that a population of haters? no. they to make discriminating judgments on the basis of how they assess the new leader of the same country so western europeans were unhappy with the leader they saw as an inarticulate proponent of unilateral action and who had a swagger in his step and not interested in their opinion and when the president left office in the new president seemed to be very good at articulating why it was in u.s. interest to be a multi a latterly, seek cooperation with other countries and embody a set of ideals about america as the united states is a land of opportunity all of a sudden it was very popular so there is not the deep and underlying consistent hatred of united states but it is rare. but foreigners can make distinguishing judgments of different aspects and behave accordingly. >>host: why should we care which germans think? when is the last time we were asked what we thought of angela merkle? >>guest: many in germ
and special assistant to president george w. bush for his eight years in office. tell me first about this photograph right here, as the president and vice president. >> i'd like to call this photo timing is everything. it's a picture of the president and the vice president checking their watches at the same time but it's one of those lucky moments that i captured during the first early parts of the administration, and what i like about this picture is it's a great example of how timely president bush was. he usually started his meetings on time or early, usually early, and so this is really a unique fund moment. and those are the moments that are unscripted, moments that are surprises between all the formal meetings and all the protocol. those are the fund moment for me to capture as the white house photographer. >> how did you become the white house photographer? >> in my case, i was a news photographer. i was staff with "the associated press," and after the election in 2000 you might remember the recount where the election was and decided that evening. well, during the recount i de
remember when the bush tax cuts first came out and tom daschle and dick gephardt were the minority leaders. they didn't have anything. they didn't have the house and they didn't have the senate or the white house. yet they came out with this ridiculous show for the press with visual aids. they had to "meet the press" outside because they had a brand-new lexus and they had a rusty muffler. that is what he is going to get, the rich guy. this is all you are getting and basically they said there is nothing in it for you if you are middle class or poor. this is only for the rich and we know that is not true. most people bought it and in fact to this day, most republicans i talk to its unbelievable. forget about the truth. is the perception of the truth. it's amazing. terms like gridlock, a came from them. the last congress was the worst congress ever because they got less done. not quality, quantity. >> guest: very good points. look, the democrats attacked the reagan tax cuts and said they would be awful and unfair and of course we got the longest movement in american history and they attacked
narrative about the financial crisis led to the dodd-frank act". .. >> president bush's prediction was, of course, a very bad one, as we know, and needless to say similar and, no doubt, equally bad predictions have been made about the effects of the dodd-frank act which we'll be discussing today. such predictions highlight a predictable cycle in the wake of a financial crisis. there is an inevitable political reaction based on political, not necessarily economic or financial logic, and the political logic goes something like this. i as a politician must do something, what could i possibly do? well, i could always expand and reorganize regulatory bureaucracies even if viewed over time it doesn't work or, indeed, is perverse to do so. a famous be military theorist talked about the fog of war in a financial crisis we have the fog of the crisis followed by the fog of legislation. but it's even worse if the voluminous legislation not only reflects the fog, but is based on a wrong idea, a faulty understanding, or as peter persuasively argues, a flawed ideological narrative. peter wallison is
arrest about their opinion of the u.s. president under george w. bush it fell to a low of 12% approval. within a couple years obama with the day. approval was 92%. it's people who can make discriminating judgment on the basis of how they assess the new leader of the same country and many western europeans in many places were unhappy with an inarticulate proponent of unilateral u.s. action who have faced swaggering step and didn't seem as interested in their opinion. the president left office who seem to be good at articulating what it was in the u.s. interest to behave multilaterally come to seek cooperation with other countries and so forth and also embodied a set of a deal as people america at the united states is a land of opportunity where anything is possible. so there is a big deep and underlying said hatred. it's actually quite rare. we thank foreigners are able to make establishing judgments about different aspects of the night dave. >> host: why should we care what germans think of us? was the last time we were asked what we thought of angela merkel? >> guest: many are interes
on the street of london. even if barack obama or bush wanted to, obviously the secret service would not let them get out of the limo and interfere with a mugging or run to a building. it's a different kind of job. it has a symbolic power. in the end we're not surprised when you see a mayor out at the site of an accident or pulling somebody out of a burning buildings, ultimately the mayor sees himself, herself, first of all, as a neighborhood. someone who has to solve problems. this is reflected by the way in the statistics. we know that the trust in public authorities in american throughout the western world and much of the world has plummeted. congress has 12% in some poll, the presidency, not this president, the 30 and 0th. this president is considered wildly popular because he has 52% support right now. the supreme court numbers have gone down. mayors and city counsel are still in the '70s and '80s. some say it's the hallow effect. you are exempt from the general critique. neighbors retain trust in democracy that has been largely lost elsewhere, which means also our relationship to our town a
, and under the bush administration there was upset because of action. so, it's a struggle to find that fine line. >> host: i think break time. >> guest: great. >> host: then there was libya. which could arguably be a success. some people say a distraction or whatnot but certainly a place where hillary clinton played a pivotal role. she travels to france, as you document in your book, and she basically wants to make sure that other people are going to contribute before -- doesn't seem like she is giving hints the obama administration is going act but she wants to make sure that other people will act with the united states if there's action. so, explain what she is doing in france. >> guest: first, let me give you the context of the trip. i it was one of the most insane trips i have been on. everything was on the move. it felt like the world was ending. you had the earthquake in japan with the tsunami there and the nuclear crisis. you had a crisis with pakistan where the contractor roman davis was detained. you had the revolution that was just ending in egypt, hosni mubarak had just stepped d
because of an action and under the bush initiative that was upset because of action. it's a struggle to find that fine line. >> host: i think it's break time. >> "after words" is available through podcasts. click podcast on the upper left side of the page. select which podcast you would like to download and listen to "after words" while you travel. >> host: and then there was libya. which could argue be a success, some people say a distraction or whatnot, but certainly hillary clinton played little role. she traveled to france as you document in your book, and she basically wants to make sure the other people are going to contribute before -- doesn't seem like she's giving hands that the obama initiation is going to act but she wants to first make sure other people will act with the united states if there is action. so explain what she's doing in france. >> guest: let me to the context of the trip because it was one of the most incentives that i have been on. everything was on the move. it felt like the world was ending. you had the earthquake in japan with economic their. you had a
the seen steady to president bush at least implicitly saw his support for more troops. did you ever hear back from the president? >> guest: let's first talk about the study. i hadn't been on the ground i saw that on may 6 for something. probably one of the best in the country and i took it seriously when a friend showed it to me in the draft and i said it forward as you point out a summary for secretary rumsfeld i wasn't too surprised i didn't hear that i hadn't even been to iraq yet nor did i say we agreed we needed more troops i frankly didn't know. sing reaction with the president. i said there's a study. i'm a diplomat, not a military expert i don't know if it is right or wrong but it's worth looking at. president said we are getting more troops, colin powell at the time was trying to get more troops into the coalition that was his reaction and we didn't find that surprising since i didn't know myself at the time if we needed more troops. >> host: the next time you mentioned raising that issue is may 18th, 2004 as you are getting ready to go out to be a did you not raise it when you
. in these parts of the world this is down from the last year of george bush's administration. .. with friends or countries you don't necessarily before. i think benghazi is a moment that will be associated with the secretary. i think some questions remain unanswered england questions the cia and the pentagon and white house and the political debate house to some extent blurred the picture a little bit. i think that in the big picture with information that we have now i don't think it changes her legacy that much better will be used against her if she decides to run for president and she reenters the political light that jury briefly the big picture is that these things, these tragedies unfortunately happened when you're doing diplomacy in these places or a journalist in these places. america lost one of its great embassadors but under president ronald reagan's watch it is the first thing people associate with the name. she was free elective accept of course for the relatives of those who died in beirut to it's hard to say how it will affect her legacy that it continues to be associated with h
and mining call singh, who advised president george w. bush. this was hosted by the washington institute. it is about 90 minutes. >> good afternoon. good afternoon and welcome to the washington institute. i'm rob satlof, the director of the institute. i'm happy to welcome all of you here today. just at the outset if i could please remind you, cell phones off please, not just on, on vibrate but off completely. this event is being live streamed for our thousands of fans around the world. this event is being broadcast by c-span. so everything you say can and will be used against you. so but bless do turn your cell phones off. we're fathered here today because president obama is off for the inaugural overseas visit of his second term and he is going to the middle east, going to israel, to the west bank and to jordan. his itinerary is very different than the itinerary of his middle east trip in the beginning of his first term. we'll hear more about that. and i think the mission of this trip is very different than the mission of that inaugural trip of his first term. we're going to hear about
. and we've drifted gradually through the bush years and into the obama years, in which those qualities of that program have been undermined. and president obama is overtly advocating relaxing some of the rules that mandate work requirements for some of the people that are involved heemplet he ihere.he's retreati. that's the wrong way. we have a group of senators, fine people, meeting in secret. maybe they're down the hall now. i don't know where they are. they're plotting right now to pass us an immigration plan. and we just can't wait to see what it is so we can just vote for whatever they decide we ought to have. and you know what they tell us? we can't get workers. we go go got to have foreign wo. we've never had more people on welfare. never had more people on food stamps. in 2001 we spent $20 billion on food stamps. last year we spent $80 billion on food stamps. it's gone up fourfold. but we're told there are not enough americans to do work. somehow this welfare office needs to be dealing with this problem. and we need to have a consolidated program. but there's no plan in this bu
because of inaction, and, you know, under the bush administration there was upset because of action. so it's a struggle to find that fine line. >> host: i think it's break time. [laughter] >> guest: great. >> on the go? "after words" is available via podcast. visit booktv.org and click podcast on the upper left side of the page. select which podcast you'd like to download and listen to "after words" while you travel. >> host: and then there was libya which could argue be a success. some people say, you know, a distraction or what not but certainly a place where hillary clinton played a pivotal role. she travels to to france as you document in your book, and she basically wants to make sure that other people are going to contribute before -- and it doesn't seem like she's giving hints that the obama administration is going to act, but she wants to first make sure that other people will act with the united states if there's action. so explain, explain what she, what she's doing in france. >> guest: well, first, let me give you the context of that trip because it was one of the most insane tr
the first george bush was president, and we were saying, they're saying maybe he's not quite getting the arrival of yeltsin. i said why do we get richard nixon to write a piece for us. they said he will never utter the "washington post." and by gosh, he wrote of these. it was a pretty good one. i came in and i said we need to work up we called his office the next morning. i can't believe i spoke to. he was up all night working on it, and so we ran it. apparently, i was told it had some influence that brent scowcroft like the peace and gave it to president bush and it was a part of his policy. >> another question over here. >> thank you very much. my name is terry stevenson to either question about during the time of the watergate hearings and so the information came out as far as nixon burglarizing the office in so many other things i'd do if it makes you indeed impeachment or not, when we go into the future, patriot act, subsequent legislation, how much of what nixon got in trouble for now would be legal? >> well, not, burglary -- [laughter] >> i'll tell you what we know about presi
their opinion. under george w. bush fell to a low of 12% approval. obama was elected. approval was 92%. the study population of haters? now, people who make discriminating judgment on the basis of how they assess the new leader of the same country and many western europeans and people in other places weren't happy with the leader they saw as an articulate proponent of unilateral u.s. action to seem to have a swagger and a second in the interests and opinions. when the president left office, a new president seemed to be good at articulating why was in the u.s. interest to behave multilaterally, to see cooperation and so forth and also embodied a set of ideals that people like about america like the united states is a land of opportunity where anything is possible. so there isn't a deep and underlying consistent hatred of the united states. that's actually quite rare. within foreigners are able to make distinguishing judgments about different aspects of the united states. >> host: why should we care what your think of us? when's the last taboo roster with that of angela merkel? >> guest
and special assistant to president george w. bush for his eight years in office. sir, can you tell me first about this paragraph right here, january 26, 2001? the president and vice president? >> this photo is timing is everything. it is a picture of the president and vice president. it shows all the formal meetings and the protocols, but those are the fun moments for me to capture. after the election in 2000, you might remember the recount. with the election wasn't decided that evening. i actually made a personal pitch and asked him for the job and the timing was appropriate. >> this image here shows the president. his famous moment and he began immediately to prepare for his first statement in reaction to the attacks and to the world. it is extremely intense for a moment. >> in the last photo you want to talk to you about this. august 7, 2001, crawford, texas. >> yes, we were documenting the president is a texan. that is two years. i was able to get away from washington. it was just another side to the president that i had the privilege to document. >> you are special assistant. what does
an example. you remember when the bush tax cuts first came out and daschle, tom daschle and dick gephardt, they were the minority leaders. they didn't even have, they didn't have anything. they didn't have the house, they didn't have the senate, they didn't have the white house. yet they came out with this ridiculous show for the press with visual aids. they had to meet the press outside because they had a big, brand new lexus, and they had a rusty muffler. see, that's what he's going to get -- the rich guy, that is -- this is all you're getting, and basically they said there's nothing in it for you if you're middle class and poor. he's only doing this for the rich. well, we know that's not true, but most people bought it. in fact, to this day most people, i mean, most republicans i talk to, it's unbelievable. you know? i mean, forget about the truth, it's the perception of the truth. and, you know, it's amazing, i mean, you know, terms like gridlock, it came from them, you know? i mean, like they said the last congress was the worst congress ever because they got less done. not quality,
, nothing close to it. people said president bush was irresponsible. he should have been more wary of the grand promises that the economy would never have a recession and that things are going to go great. he should have. the next to the last year when he was in office, the budget deficit was $167 billion. it had dropped from a higher figure in his time in office. his last year was $450 billion or $460 billion. president obama has been in office four full years, starting his fifth, and his deficits have been averaging 1,200,000,000,000 dollars a year. we have never, ever seen anything like this before. it has surged the united states of america and our democratic colleagues don't have a plan that will put us on a sustainable path in the future. if we come back out of the economy, we restrain the spending growth just a little bit, we can balance the budget. that's what we ought to do. and again, a goal of balancing the budget is not just some frivolous goal for political reasons. the goal of a balanced budget is that we would put us on a sound financial course. it will mean we have
fragile, lightweight. they float off the bush and land on your neck and you you reach back to gently brush it off on the bus by the time you put your hand down to your side you have the rash. so my mom couldn't go down there with rashes to work. so i took it upon myself to say well let's take it to the top. who do i go see to manage the project and i went in and talk to someone about the real problem. what's the problem? caterpillars. right away when i mention caterpillars he told me to get out of his office. i told them i said look i live here and i have the right to talk to you about the caterpillars. they are denuded they had a panic button. the congressman should know but the panic button. the police showed up in the projects and the projects god came in and they rushed me out of the office and he said get him out of my office. i broke loose and something i was raised on a my household by my dad. he would give me 48 hours. i said you have 48 hours to solve the problem. [laughter] he looked back at me and he said and the police looked at me and he said are you threatening him? no sir i'
. they are doing it. sender rand paul said right at cpac the gop of all has grown stale and moscow. jeb bush last night and again if you haven't read it, jeb bush in "the wall street journal," began to offer a dramatic vision of a better, more dynamic, more inclusive republican party that doesn't act in at th the age ofa lightbulb, that doesn't stand a pioneer of the future and that does understand there is no red and there is no blue. there are 311 million americans who deserve a party that wants everyone of them have a dramatically better future. that ought to be the republican party. [applause] >> we are not the anti-obama movement. we are for the american future with greater safety, freedom and prosperity for all. we are for empowering individuals, not empowering bureaucrats. i think there are dozens, and you can see in the as ever in a newsletter two weeks ago on pioneers of the future versus prisoners of the past, there are dozens of new areas we are about to break and we about to be dramatically better opportunity, and the city and both parties is literally blind to the great potential of
colleagues that when president george w. bush's tax cut was passed in 2001, it was defended on the grounds that it was only going to take a small part of the projected surplus as that we were going to have for the next ten years. that was -- that's what was said. well, as we now know, those surpluses didn't materialize. we had the tax cuts, we had two unpaid-for wars that completely wiped out the expected surpluses, and yet we kept those big tax cuts going. and to created big deficits. and then the onslaught of the great recession in 2008 pushed our deficits even higher. and today, today only one-eighth of the revenues lost by the bush tax cuts have been restored. one-eighth. one-eighth. yet many of the republicans keep repeating their mantra that we only have a spending problem, only a spending problem, not a revenue problem. this is demonstrably not the case. now, we go back in time when i was here when president reagan pushed through some tax cuts when he came in as president, but i would say to his credit, he realized they went too far so he reversed course and supported two income tax
of marriage that enacted during the bush a ministration it will be shown again wednesday night at 8:00 eastern on c-span. >> tonight, rachael jackson dies of apparent heart attack before interjection takes office. his knees becomes the white house hostess but is let it is best. during the nixon ministration angelica van buren is the white house hostess for father-in-law who was a widower. we will include questions and comments by phone, facebook, and twitter live tonight at 9:00 eastern on c-span and c-span radio in c-span.org. >> this month marks the tenth anniversary of the iraq war. a look at how it changed the middle east with an update and major general h.r. mcmaster. they participated in a panel discussion hosted by the carnegie endowment for international piece. this is about our into minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> okay. we have explored now in some depth the state of iraq today and have looked at what the war has cost the american taxpayer and the american economy and how that relates to the fiscal problems that we are facing today. and we turn now to the geopolitical losses of
. in that period, came out the comments of president bush and others that we don't go to war based on green eyes shaded accountants stuff in this country. he argued was not so much around the numbers. i think the numbers, the discussion among budget people around 1.7 or 1.9, how much tricare, our money. the areas of big, the two main areas of disagreement among economists are, one, should one include the financing costs or not? should one include the cost community, if you say my house cost 500,000, you don't usually include the cost of your mortgage even though you know you will be paying 5%, whatever. the second issue is around to what extent the more indirectly contributed to the financial crisis, oil price increases and so forth. so in the oil price area what we did was oil prices went up by $100 a barrel. we've only contributed between five and $10 a barrel of that increase to the war cost which is already several hundred billion. we have certainly from discussing it with mainstream people, like dan yergin, you know, found pretty strong support for tripping some percentage of that oil price
bush got engaged in a war that used up so much of his time and effort. president obama is not trained as a manager. he's never been a manager, not been a governor or managed a business and has too little tough, serious management of the taxpayers' money in this country. and it's time for us to get under control the spending that goes on here. and in my humble opinion, the american people are tired of sending more money to washington because we run out. and we say it's not our fault. it's just the way things are. we can't have any reduction in spending. children and the people that are hurt and painful, hungry, women, the elderly, singles, marrieds, whatever, they've got to have more money. and any change in our policy whatsoever means that somebody is not getting something they're entitled to. well, the truth is many of our programs serve many good people in need, but almost all of those problems have serious management problems that they could be run effectively and eif i recollectly, and -- efficiently and the program would cost substantially less without any significant diminishmen
had heard of edmund musky and george bush. and i go back there every now and then, because it recalls a lot of pleasant childhood memories from the late 50's. >> why did you do that? >> well, it was a summer job during high school days, and i first got exposed to new england because my great uncle by marriage, calvin coolidge, from which the cal comes, was from that area, and my parents took me out to northampton, massachusetts to meet grace coolidge, and was just incredibly mpressed by her grace and her just wonderful mind, and roamed around her house at the age, i think, of 13 or 14, and since joined the coolidge memorial society, which sends me the raw speeches unedited by historians or commentators of a man who has really been slandered by those historians who didn't say a whole lot. but when he did say something, he had something to say. he wouldn't do very well in this age. >> now, how is the relationship? how did it work? >> my grandfather on my mother's side and mrs. coolidge were first cousins, and they double- dated during their premarital days. and i still have a lot of stu
, it shouldn't come as a surprise, we recall, i was here in 2001 when i voted against the bush tax cuts then because the mantra was back then they are the job creators. just cut those taxes and those jobs will grow. we saw during the bush administration one of the poorest private-job creation records of any president since world war ii. and there's no rhyme or reason. and here we are, it's, as they say, deja vu all over again. cut the taxes and magically the jobs will grow. you grow jobs by having a balance between investment, in human capital, in physical capital like roads and bridges, and also having the revenue to be responsible so you pay your way. ms. stabenow: if the senator -- thank you very much. thank you to this really distinguished senator from rhode island. i do want to say when i listen to you, i think so often of your advocacy for member who are troops -- for men and women who are troops. when you think about $400,000 being the average tax cut for a multimillionaire under this budget versus what will happen to our veterans or folks coming home from the war now trying to g
model that they are as far as delivery to a patient by bush to have specific needs. ensuring that they are integrated into the future delivery system so that they are connected with health insurance plans, that they may not that they may never been for me with in the past. network of providers. these are a lot of areas that traditional providers have not been estimate with the as a result of that, the department of the work of the health resources and services mr. risch as well as fda mrs. looking for opportunity to ensure that our providers are ready for 2014 and beyond. coupled with that, we looking at our existing network of providers like committee health centers and other providers across the country that are serving underserved communities and what can we do better to train these providers to better meet the needs of people living with hiv, and lgbt community. also agree specifically to meet the needs of the lgbt community. we have existing resources like the appropriate standard services standard, the class standards. we're about it at the department the time to update
contracting the market bush folks may agree or disagree with. even on different pieces, you're still talking about operating within the existing system, the existing regime, which is the simplistic taxpayer guaranteed. is not system broke a? if you're caught doing this is to protect the taxpayer, isn't it true you're not going to go to protect the taxpayer and to get rid of the guaranteed? the only way you get rid of the conflicts, which is discussed remasters right now. you've got the taxpayers and their circumstances under which are asked to contribute to housing trust fund dicicco private shareholders. is not whole system fundamentally flawed regardless of anything you do, were so going to have issues in the long run. >> it is broken and i look forward to working with the congress. >> is it possible to fix it with the taxpayer guarantee, the implicit taxpayer guarantee in place. the church of church of a system where you become an agency or private entity, one or the other come you can't be both. >> unique to clarify its exposure. the model you're talking about broken is the complete melt
's a lot going where she beat jeb bush and marco rubio by double digits. she thought it would be a strong candidate. joe biden is strong candidate and we have an enormous number of good governors. martin of mali, governor cuomo of colorado. so i'm excited. >> are never going to complain. >> part of barack obama's appeal was young and vibrant. [inaudible] [laughter] >> in presidential politics -- as the country moves to a next generation of readership, they rarely if ever reach back and bring in an older generation. to a certain extent that was a factor for senator mccain in running against president obama in part the effect of governor romney right now and that is an interesting dynamic answers out of the two most likely nominees are going to be on the democratic side. there's a lot of pressure leadership in the republican party that will bring about a generational change that will be very hoped we. marco rubio, paul ryan, alisa to, bobby jindal. a very clear shift moving forward. one other thing is his numbers have been rising pretty dramatically and i'm pretty sure 50% is not upside dow
including by special appointment by both the clinton and bush justice departments. he's established himself as a tireless public servant and a defender of the public interest. and for these reasons and more we, the ncrc, awarded him with the henry b. gonzalez award in 2010 for his outstanding public service. and so we're pleased to have him here. so help me welcome the director of the cfpb, richard cordray. thank youment. [applause] >> thank you. thank you, bob. i could feel your distress as john was up here speaking about the -- i was afraid he might refer to the internets, and we might have to give him the hook. john told you he's over 50, i'm slightly over 50. [laughter] and back in our day between was part of the song rockin' robin, remember little michael jackson used to sing that. [laughter] now it has a much more respectable pedigree. [laughter] thank you, all of you, for inviting me here to be with you today. because of what you do every day, fighting to improve the lives of the nation's most vulnerable and underserved consumers, you are my personal heroes, and you set an important
, reagan, bush. is the party doing enough to support the rising star governors once they get past that state endorsement process? >> well, i mean, that's the plan for 2013 and 2014. um, i know that state parties sure do a lot of work and, obviously, the rga does. you know, we have a different party too. i mean, you know, i don't know, 15, 20 years ago maybe more there budget an nrcc, there wasn't 10, 20 different super pacs and 527s. we have a big group of organizations that are involved in getting republicans and conservatives elected. so my, my job is to put together not only the best infrastructure and data and mechanics, but we've got our primary system that needs to be looked at. and i think overall messaging. but for the most part, a lot of players out there that are doing a lot of this work. the rnc has to play a role in promoting governors. they're the innovators. their balancing budgets. they're getting things done. they're leading the way. and we're going to be involved. but there's also a lot of different groups now that are involved in this same activity. >> be questio
congress, including the deal on the bush tax cuts that were made at year end. $2.4 trillion of deficit reduction over the next ten years. and all also agree that $is.8is- that $1.8 trillion was gutting expenses and a little more than $600 billion of this was revenues achieved through the year-end bush tax cut deal. so everwhelmingly what has been done thus far has been in spending cuts rather than new revenues. it is very important for us to know that. it is very important for folks to realize that democrats are willing to make are hard calls about spending. we've done it already. but the question before this body and the question before the house now is going forward, what do we do to achieve additional deficit reduction that's consistent with having a growing economy? and the approaches of the senate and the house on this could not be more different. the house approach basically says that all additional deficit reduction should be achieved by cutting spending. by looking at one side of the balance sheet. i do not know of a business, i do not know of a family, i do not know of other u
the court hears arguments on the constitutionality of the defense of marriage act enacted during the bush administration. again, c-span and c-span radio will have coverage when the arguments are released to the public at about 2 eastern. it'll be shown again wednesday night at 8 over on c-span. >> let's go straight to a personal topic. you been on the commission since 2006, the chairman's been on since, i believe, 2009. his term is up, yours will be up next year. should we expect to see some turnover at the commission? >> guest: well, you should always expect to see turnover at the commission because we all have staggered terms. >> right. >> guest: the past six years have flown by very quickly, and we shall see, you know? stay tuned. you know, i get asked this question every couple of years, and when you've been there almost seven years, you get asked at inflection points like this. i'm openly thinking about it, but we shall see. >> host: openly thinking about what? >> guest: about what to do next. i have thought about that several times, you know, what comes after the commission. you kno
when president george w. bush launched a war of choice in iraq. dragging our country into a costly, bitter conflict based on falsehoods and hyperbole. it took president obama fulfilling his campaign promise to end the iraq war and we are grateful that he brought the war to an end. but we must not forget how we got into the war in the first place. so that these mistakes are not repeated. we were told there were weapons of mass destruction. we were warned about mushroom clouds. now i offered an amendment at the time that would have taken us down a different path. it would have required the united states to work through the united nations inspectors and maximizing diplomacy to determine whether or not iraq was developing weapons of mass destruction. unfortunately my amendment failed by a vote of 72-355. what happened from there we all know the tragic consequences. president bush dragged this country into an unnecessary war. no weapons of mass destruction were ever found. the cost of the iraq war soared far beyond what was projected. we lost 4,400 american troops in iraq and over 32,00
because we failed to be informed and hold the administration -- whether it's a bush administration or obama administration, all of them are guilty. and the reason they're guilty is because we aren't raising the questions. so i'd ask my colleagues, you're going to get a vote on a lot of this stuff, a lot of my amendments have bipartisan support, but we're going to vote, you get to vote on whether you think we ought to eliminate duplication. you'll have 17 separate votes on that. i'll try to wind those into two votes. vote against fixing it and then go home and tell americans you want to raise their taxes a trillion dollars. the presiding officer: the senator's time has expired. mr. coburn: and you do not want to eliminate the stupidity going on in washington. i thank the chairman and the ranking member for the time. the presiding officer: the senator from virginia. mr. warner: i just want to take one moment before i yield time to the senator from delaware to --. the presiding officer: there will be no expressions from the gallery. mr. warner: i commend my friend, the senator from ok
people in danger. wake up, colleagues. please wake up before it's too late. the fact is the bush administration found -- we got this through documentation, that climate change was a threat. the c.i.a. has found that climate change is a threat. the defense establishment has found that climate change is a threat. the only place that doesn't seem to get excited about it is right here in a bipartisan way in the u.s. senate. we know, again, temperatures are continuing to increase. the draft national climate assessment january 11, 2013, said heat caused by climate disruption is especially harmful to our children. now, i want to talk to colleagues who might just be listening -- they might not be because it is 7:20 at night. but if they are, you all say you want to protect our kids. you all love your children and your grandchildren and your nieces and your nephews. according to the american academy of pediatrics committee -- and i think we have a chart on that -- anticipated direct health consequences of climate change include injury and death from extreme weather events and natural disa
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37